Highly critical report puts Jerounds Primary into special measures

A HARLOW primary school has been placed into special measures following an inspection by government watchdog Ofsted.

Jerounds Primary School in Pyenest Road, was inspected over two days in March 2017.

The inspectors have told the troubled school: “In accordance with section 44(1) of the Education Act 2005, Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector is of the opinion that this school requires special measures because it is failing to give its pupils an acceptable standard of education and the persons responsible for leading, managing or governing the school are not demonstrating the capacity to secure the necessary improvement in the school.

The headteacher is Ms Kath Holland.

The chair of governors is Mr David Dennis

Here is a list of some of the criticisms

1. Leaders and governors have not ensured that child protection systems are fit for purpose. They do not keep appropriately detailed and thorough records of concerns about individual pupils.

2. Safeguarding procedures are not sufficiently robust to ensure that timely and effective action is taken in response to child protection concerns. Leaders do not review their actions well or regularly enough.

3. Leaders’ evaluation of the school’s performance is over-generous. Leaders have accepted the results from the end of key stage assessments as the only measure of pupils’ achievement. This means that priorities across the school are not quickly identified and addressed.

4. Governors do not have a clear understanding of the school’s strengths and weaknesses. They are not holding the school to account as well as they should.

5. Teachers do not routinely provide the most able pupils with learning activities that enable them to make the progress of which they are capable.

6. The good pupil outcomes achieved at the end of key stage 1 are not sustained in lower key stage 2. This is because the quality of teaching, learning and assessment is not good enough.

7. In 2016, by the end of key stage 2, pupils made significantly less progress than other pupils nationally in reading and mathematics. Pupils’ progress across the school varies too widely.

8. Staff are not held to account for the progress of different groups of pupils in their classes so do not swiftly help pupils who are falling behind to catch up.

The Good Points

1. Pupils behave well. They are very polite, courteous and supportive of one another. They want to learn and succeed. They work hard.

2. Leaders in school use their additional funding well. They provide an increasingly effective range of support for disadvantaged pupils and for those who have special educational needs and/or disabilities.

3. Pupils have started to make better progress in reading, writing and mathematics in upper key stage 2.

4. Pupils achieve well in key stage 1. This has been the case for a number of years.

5. Children settle quickly in Reception. They are happy and follow routines well.

Jerounds

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