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Princess Alexandra Hospital marks World Sepsis Day

Health / Fri 16th Sep 2022 am30 07:21am

THIS month, we marked World Sepsis Day (13 September) at PAHT. We are encouraging our community to be aware of the symptoms of sepsis, a potentially life-threatening disease.


Sepsis occurs when the body’s response to an infection injures its own tissues and organs. It may lead to multi-organ failure, and death – especially if it has not been recognised early and treated promptly. Although treatable, 48,000 people die from sepsis per year.

Our sepsis team are dedicated to improving outcomes for patients with sepsis, with early identification and treatment of the disease at our hospital, specialist training for our people, and raising awareness of the signs to look out for in yourself, your friends and family.

Did you know?

·       Everyone can get sepsis; however, certain people are at even higher risk, including people with a weakened immune system, adults over the age of 60, children under the age of one, people with no spleen and people with chronic diseases

·       You cannot catch sepsis from another person

·       Sepsis is sometimes called septicaemia or blood poisoning

Symptoms

·       Sepsis is life-threatening and can be hard to spot. There are lots of possible symptoms, which can be vague and can be like symptoms of other conditions, including flu or a chest infection

·       Call 999 or go to A&E if a baby or young child has any of these symptoms of sepsis:

o   blue, pale or blotchy skin, lips or tongue

o   a rash that does not fade when you roll a glass over it, the same as meningitis

o   difficulty breathing (you may notice grunting noises or their stomach sucking under their ribcage), breathlessness or breathing very fast

o   a weak, high-pitched cry that’s not like their normal cry

o   not responding like they normally do, or not interested in feeding or normal activities

o   being sleepier than normal or difficult to wake

They may not have all these symptoms.

·       Call 999 or go to A&E if an adult or older child has any of these symptoms of sepsis:

o   acting confused, slurred speech or not making sense

o   blue, pale or blotchy skin, lips or tongue

o   a rash that does not fade when you roll a glass over it, the same as meningitis

o   difficulty breathing, breathlessness or breathing very fast

They may not have all these symptoms.

·       Call 111 if you, your child or someone you look after:

o   feels very unwell or like there’s something seriously wrong

o   has not had a pee all day (for adults and older children) or in the last 12 hours (for babies and young children)

o   keeps vomiting and cannot keep any food or milk down (for babies and young children)

o   has swelling, redness or pain around a cut or wound

o   has a very high or low temperature, feels hot or cold to the touch, or is shivering

o   Do not worry if you’re not sure if it’s sepsis – it’s still best to call 111. They can tell you what to do, arrange a phone call from a nurse or doctor, or call you an ambulance.

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